Social Media & the African Narrative — A Clubhouse Event Recap

  1. The traditional media has created and fostered a negative perception of Africa, often as a place of poverty, conflict, and disease. Ivy shared that as proof of the media’s culpability, National Geographic recently apologised for decades of racist reporting on Africa. Wacera added that this reality is also rooted in the use of photography as a tool of colonisation in Africa, the same tool photographers like herself are using to change the African narrative.
  2. As content creators committed to changing the African narrative, both Ivy and Wacera think deeply and strategically about the way they create and share content online. Ivy used content about and appealing to Ghanaian, African-American, Caribbean, and others of the global Black diaspora on Ghana’s Year of Return social media to portray Ghana as an inclusive environment for all, a strategy which paid dividends in the number of the visitors who came to Ghana that year. At Everyday Africa, Wacera and her team’s structure of our storytelling is authentic to how the platform began. Since 2012, Everyday Africa photographers living and working across Africa take photos with their camera phones, freezing images of everyday life in the countries we work in. Their common ground is a camera phone, an image of everyday life, and Instagram.
  3. Finally, Wacera concluded with this poignant point on how African governments can support content creators:

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Bridget K Boakye

Bridget K Boakye

Data Science student at FlatIron School focused on Africa; Writer, Entrepreneur